Art Basel OVR:2020 | Alexander Tovborg

September 23 - 26 | 2020

For Art Basel OVR:2020, Galleri Nicolai Wallner is pleased to show a solo presentation of new works by Alexander Tovborg. With this latest series, Alexander Tovborg turns his attention towards the imagery of the Madonna.

Found throughout religious icons to the cannons of historical painting and beyond, the portrait of Madonna, often depicted alongside a baby Jesus Christ, has long fascinated Tovborg who in previous series has explored figures such as Francis of Assisi, Prometheus and Jeanne D’Arc.

Inspired by Egon Schiele’s 1908 Mother and Child (Madonna) and Marianne Stokes’ 1905 Madonna and Child, Tovborg’s series depicts his wife in the place of Madonna, with his newly born child, Dea, in her arms. This parallel that exists naturally in Tovborg’s life creates an intimate perspective.

 

 

Alexander Tovborg
dea madonna (three lilies and the serpent) (II) (2020)
Acrylic on bed linen
40 x 20 cm
15.8 x 7.8 in

To Inquire

 

 

 

 

Alexander Tovborg
dea madonna (three lillies and the serpent) (I) (2020)
Acrylic on bed linen
50.5 x 20 cm
20 x 7.8 in

To Inquire

 

 

 

Alexander Tovborg
dea madonna (I) (2020)
Acrylic on bed linen
40.5 x 30 cm
16 x 11.8 in

To Inquire

 

 

 

 

Alexander Tovborg
dea madonna (three lilies and the serpent) (IV) (2020)
Acrylic on cardboard
60.5 x 30 cm
23.8 x 11.8 in

To Inquire

 

Taking as his starting point history, mythology, religion, as well as written and oral narratives, Alexander Tovborg
(b.1983, Denmark) draws on the stories that have come before us in order to explore and re-contextualise classical archetypes. In looking at the ways through which we have built our narratives in the past, he proposes a new reading of our current social and political situation, examining who we are and where we find ourselves today.

His laborious and layered practice is such that he begins to embody the people that he is focusing on—going through the arc of their stories, adopting their beliefs, their causes and their pain. Using borrowed and created symbols in a rhythmic and insistent manner, Alexander Tovborg creates a kind of visual language which runs throughout his work, spanning different series and figures. This visual language connects the work, but also connects differing narratives, reminding us of the similarities which run through many of the world’s origin stories.

 

carrie emberlyn